NextLabs Deepens Its Microsoft Support

Microsoft Dynamics 365

In keeping with our extensive support for Microsoft applications, NextLabs now announces the release of its latest version of Entitlement Manager for Microsoft Dynamics 365 (EM for Dynamics), Microsoft’s CRM application.

We listened to our customers, looked at where the market was headed, and added features consistent with the NextLabs mission of protecting data whether at rest or on the move. This latest release also reflects our deep commitment to the Microsoft stack, augmenting our current support for SharePoint, Exchange, and Outlook.

EM for Dynamics reinforces that commitment with even more granularity and flexibility for Dynamics CRM. 

“Refresh my memory . . . what is Microsoft Dynamics again?”

Microsoft Dynamics CRM is a multi-faceted platform where everything you need to develop, enhance, and retain your client relationships is stored. It centralizes customer information, business intelligence, the ability to track sales opportunities, and more in one application. EM for Dynamics sits on the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Server and works with both on-premises and cloud deployments of Dynamics.

“What are the potential landmines of Dynamics?”

The ease with which Dynamics CRM enables collaborators to share data and manage their own fine-tuned access controls can lead to serious risk exposure in terms of inappropriate data access, distribution, and loss.

To address this challenge, EM for Dynamics was developed to enhance compliance and security for this leading CRM application. It enforces policies on the application across different Dynamics entities, such as contact, account, and so on. Based on policies, EM for Dynamics filters entity records by user attributes and entity attributes. For example, the application can enforce policies to allow account executives to view only those accounts that match their business unit and industry.

“You’ll get nothing and like it . . .”

If your company has very strict controls over who can access what in Dynamics, NextLabs now enables you to shut off access to any records in Dynamics by default. With this policy turned on, users can’t access any records unless explicitly allowed by policy. Thus, users won’t be able to View, Create, Edit, or Delete without permission.

With this approach, enterprises ensure that that their users can only access the Dynamics 365 data they need to do their jobs and are not inadvertently given access to sensitive, classified, or regulated data.

“You can go to prom, but you gotta be back by 1am”

If you don’t want to opt for the “you’ll get nothing and like it” approach to data security and prefer some flexibility, EM for Dynamics now allows you to filter data either at the record level or the field level. You can even make authorization decisions based on user attributes from the native CRM user records.

These new features ensure enterprises have the flexibility to control access to data as granularly as needed by the business or as required by policy – either at the object or field level. They also give enterprises an easy way to make actionable information available to users who would otherwise be denied access to data by policy.

Here are some other examples of the flexibility now afforded by EM for Dynamics:

  • Apply Security Filter: Allows the filtering of entity records based on the user attributes and the entity attributes
  • Display Policy Violation Message: Displays a message to users when a policy violation happens.
  • Inherit Policies From: Allows the filtering of entity records subject to the policy against its “secured” direct parent entities.
  • Apply Security Filter Based on Parent Attributes: Allows the filtering of entity records subject to the attributes against its “secured” direct parent entities.
  • Mask Fields: Allows the masking of specific fields in a record.

For more info . . .

If you’re interested in learning more about NextLabs’ solutions for the entire Microsoft stack, and not just Dynamics, click here.

My SharePoint Rights Management Wish List

By Yann Lejas, Director of Sales Engineering at NextLabs |

Most enterprises are using browser-based applications, such as Microsoft SharePoint, to store and share documents and files with their colleagues, business partners, and customers. This platform presents certain advantages: it makes information easy to share and quick to transfer. Digital documents can be accessed anywhere, any time and from pretty much any device. more “My SharePoint Rights Management Wish List”

Is this the Right time for Rights Management?

By E.K. Koh, VP of Solutions at NextLabs

It depends on whether you believe the analysts.

In the report “Information Security Predictions and Recommendations 2014”, Kuppinger Cole recommends that enterprises “Focus on strategic elements such as Information Rights Management for documents and Enterprise Key and Certificate Management (EKCM) for managing the secrets.” And, at the recent European Identity Conference, Kuppinger Cole identified Secure Information Sharing as a hot topic, by calling out Rights Management as an enabler. [Source: EIC 2014: Trends and Hot Topics, Kuppinger Cole, May 2014] more “Is this the Right time for Rights Management?”

SharePoint 2014 Key Security Takeaways – Our Top 5

By Mandy Pang, Senior Product Manager

SharePoint 2014 Key Security Takeaways – Our Top 5

  1. The conference attendees were buzzed on Attributes.  Specifically, attribute-based security models for SharePoint.  Role-based models are no longer making the cut – they leave collaboration vulnerable.  Attribute-based solutions have fine-grained control.
  2. Clouds, of course was big, even bigger was the topic of protecting data in-transit to/from cloud and at rest in the cloud.  Securing Office 365 was another hot topic.  There was a great deal of discussion around the need for comprehensive end-to-end protection of intellectual property while satisfying the regulations set forth by a company’s compliance office.  If the data or IP was to be accessed by or transmitted to an employee or contractor outside of the company’s firewall, then concern was expressed on how to safeguard the data.
  3. SPC14 was global with a good portion of attendees coming from Europe.  Interestingly enough, a lot of European companies are looking to the U.S., particularly Silicon Valley, for solutions on automated information rights management.
  4. The architects, developers, and I.T. leaders with which I spoke were eager to learn about how to automate fine-grained access control for all work-product in a SharePoint environment.
  5. Extensibility was also discussed.   At SPC14 the conversations were about information rights management extensibility – starting off with one Microsoft solution such as SharePoint, then extending the same information rights management solution to Office 365 and other products.

more “SharePoint 2014 Key Security Takeaways – Our Top 5”

Do you have SharePoint Site Explosion?

By Mandy Pang

Microsoft SharePoint server is an outstanding and widely adopted collaboration platform for sharing business-critical data. However, enterprises are finding that SharePoint’s permissions-based security model is not scalable and doesn’t provide adequate controls for sensitive, regulated, and highly valuable data. There is a rapid proliferation of SharePoint sites and data, as well as SharePoint’s ad-hoc collaboration and discretionary access control model.  Due to the rapid proliferation, organizations face an increased risk that their sensitive data will be leaked or mishandled. Because of this, users are more likely to grant access to critical assets in SharePoint in ways that may result in non-compliance and intellectual property (IP) leakage. more “Do you have SharePoint Site Explosion?”

Common Headaches About Permissions

By Mandy Pang.

In my last post, I talked about the high level challenges with permissions, and how new capabilities such as Active Directory Rights Management Server (AD RMS) and Windows Server 2012 Dynamic Access Control (DAC) offer some promising options for access control, but remain siloed within Windows File Server environments.
In this post, I would like to elaborate on the challenges of permissions. more “Common Headaches About Permissions”

Problems with Permissions

By Mandy Pang.

Collaborative technologies such as e-mail, instant messaging, Microsoft SharePoint, extranet portals, and software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications make it easier to share information and communicate innovations. In a typical Microsoft environment, Office documents may be created on the desktop, then loaded to a File Server for internal sharing. Or they may be uploaded to SharePoint for sharing with your supply chain, or be emailed to a fellow employee overseas. Note the ease with which IP can be transformed, duplicated and shared. more “Problems with Permissions”

SharePoint 2013: Exciting new capabilities to share (leak?) sensitive data

By Andy Han

SharePoint 2013, made generally available (GA) earlier this year, introduces several new features that will impact how information is shared across the enterprise: new social capabilities, improved search, cross-site publishing, and a roadmap for companies that want to move to Office 365 in the Azure cloud. The net impact seems to be that sharing information inside and outside an organization will be even easier. This will likely create new challenges for organizations that want to control how teams are accessing and distributing data in SharePoint. more “SharePoint 2013: Exciting new capabilities to share (leak?) sensitive data”