Is this the Right time for Rights Management?

By E.K. Koh, VP of Solutions at NextLabs

It depends on whether you believe the analysts.

In the report “Information Security Predictions and Recommendations 2014”, Kuppinger Cole recommends that enterprises “Focus on strategic elements such as Information Rights Management for documents and Enterprise Key and Certificate Management (EKCM) for managing the secrets.” And, at the recent European Identity Conference, Kuppinger Cole identified Secure Information Sharing as a hot topic, by calling out Rights Management as an enabler. [Source: EIC 2014: Trends and Hot Topics, Kuppinger Cole, May 2014] more “Is this the Right time for Rights Management?”

What are the Financial Costs of Data Loss?

By E.K. Koh, VP of Solutions at NextLabs |

The direct financial costs include future loss of revenue when trade secrets are stolen today. According to the Battelle Foundation report “2013 Global R&D Funding Forecast”, the financial costs of intellectual property theft – internal and external – are compounded over time. When trade secrets are stolen, so is the future revenue that would come from licensing and sales of the research and of the products created. more “What are the Financial Costs of Data Loss?”

SAP Field Level Security – Augmenting Roles with Attributes

By Ashwin Bhaskar, Senior Software Engineer at NextLabs

In the first part of the blog Series, we discussed the importance of ABAC (Attributes Based Access Control) as a way to augment traditional RBAC (Role Based Access Controls) for field level security.

Let us now analyze how we can go about implementing field level security using a combination of RBAC and ABAC approaches. more “SAP Field Level Security – Augmenting Roles with Attributes”

Data Security in the Cloud – beyond Encryption

by Sudhindra Kumar, Principal Software Engineer at NextLabs

Kentucky recently joined 46 other states in the U.S. that enacted a data breach notification law.  California is the vanguard – enacting the first such law in 2002.  And now, the high profile data breaches of retailers Target and Neiman Marcus are serving as stimulants for revisions to and improvements of the breach notification laws. more “Data Security in the Cloud – beyond Encryption”

Do you have SharePoint Site Explosion?

By Mandy Pang

Microsoft SharePoint server is an outstanding and widely adopted collaboration platform for sharing business-critical data. However, enterprises are finding that SharePoint’s permissions-based security model is not scalable and doesn’t provide adequate controls for sensitive, regulated, and highly valuable data. There is a rapid proliferation of SharePoint sites and data, as well as SharePoint’s ad-hoc collaboration and discretionary access control model.  Due to the rapid proliferation, organizations face an increased risk that their sensitive data will be leaked or mishandled. Because of this, users are more likely to grant access to critical assets in SharePoint in ways that may result in non-compliance and intellectual property (IP) leakage. more “Do you have SharePoint Site Explosion?”

Cloud Security – Protecting data at rest and in transit – Information Risk Management for the Cloud

By Sudhindra Kumar, Principal Software Engineer at NextLabs

In my previous blog, we discussed about Data Governance Policies and Regulatory Compliance.

In this post, we’ll see some of the options available to protect data at rest and in transit. A few years ago, protecting data in transit was considered more important than protecting data at rest. However, with the proliferation of Internet and cloud technologies, and the subsequent issues related to data breaches have put the spotlight on protecting data at rest as well. Let us take a look at different solutions for protecting data at rest and in transit: more “Cloud Security – Protecting data at rest and in transit – Information Risk Management for the Cloud”

Can we turn off Snowden’s access after the fact?

By E.K. Koh

In my last blog, Would data-level controls have stopped Snowden, I highlighted the importance to separate system rights from data rights. But what if Snowden was using a login credential that in fact grants him rights to sensitive data? Accounts vary, but in the blog What the Snowden affair taught us , Anand alluded to the fact that Snowden gained access by stealing credentials of users with higher privilege. Unfortunately, even a system with fine grained data entitlement capabilities will not be able to stop Snowden, under his new identity, from copying sensitive data. more “Can we turn off Snowden’s access after the fact?”