SharePoint 2014 Key Security Takeaways – Our Top 5

By Mandy Pang, Senior Product Manager

SharePoint 2014 Key Security Takeaways – Our Top 5

  1. The conference attendees were buzzed on Attributes.  Specifically, attribute-based security models for SharePoint.  Role-based models are no longer making the cut – they leave collaboration vulnerable.  Attribute-based solutions have fine-grained control.
  2. Clouds, of course was big, even bigger was the topic of protecting data in-transit to/from cloud and at rest in the cloud.  Securing Office 365 was another hot topic.  There was a great deal of discussion around the need for comprehensive end-to-end protection of intellectual property while satisfying the regulations set forth by a company’s compliance office.  If the data or IP was to be accessed by or transmitted to an employee or contractor outside of the company’s firewall, then concern was expressed on how to safeguard the data.
  3. SPC14 was global with a good portion of attendees coming from Europe.  Interestingly enough, a lot of European companies are looking to the U.S., particularly Silicon Valley, for solutions on automated information rights management.
  4. The architects, developers, and I.T. leaders with which I spoke were eager to learn about how to automate fine-grained access control for all work-product in a SharePoint environment.
  5. Extensibility was also discussed.   At SPC14 the conversations were about information rights management extensibility – starting off with one Microsoft solution such as SharePoint, then extending the same information rights management solution to Office 365 and other products.

more “SharePoint 2014 Key Security Takeaways – Our Top 5”

Cloud Security – Protecting data at rest and in transit – Information Risk Management for the Cloud

By Sudhindra Kumar, Principal Software Engineer at NextLabs

In my previous blog, we discussed about Data Governance Policies and Regulatory Compliance.

In this post, we’ll see some of the options available to protect data at rest and in transit. A few years ago, protecting data in transit was considered more important than protecting data at rest. However, with the proliferation of Internet and cloud technologies, and the subsequent issues related to data breaches have put the spotlight on protecting data at rest as well. Let us take a look at different solutions for protecting data at rest and in transit: more “Cloud Security – Protecting data at rest and in transit – Information Risk Management for the Cloud”

Can we turn off Snowden’s access after the fact?

By E.K. Koh

In my last blog, Would data-level controls have stopped Snowden, I highlighted the importance to separate system rights from data rights. But what if Snowden was using a login credential that in fact grants him rights to sensitive data? Accounts vary, but in the blog What the Snowden affair taught us , Anand alluded to the fact that Snowden gained access by stealing credentials of users with higher privilege. Unfortunately, even a system with fine grained data entitlement capabilities will not be able to stop Snowden, under his new identity, from copying sensitive data. more “Can we turn off Snowden’s access after the fact?”

Attributes is the new role?

By Sandeep Chopra.

“Attributes” is the new Role?

In the last Gartner Identity and Access Summit in Nov 2013, Gregg Kreizmann, Research VP in Gartner, made a prediction that by 2020, 70% of all businesses will use attribute-based access control (ABAC) as the dominant mechanism to protect critical assets, up from <5% today.

In Oct 2013, NIST published their report titled “Guide to Attribute-based Access Control Definition and Consideration”, which we discussed in an earlier blog. This is recognition that organizations, including the federal government, need to govern how information is shared across systems, applications, and organizations. more “Attributes is the new role?”

What the Snowden affair taught us…the Super User problem

By Anand Kotti

With use of computer networks and information systems comes security risks. The risks range from unauthorized access, to lost, stolen and cyber-attack on sensitive data. In the recent past, there has been an increase in security breach by insiders, threatening to leak the information confidential to US federal authorities, which caught us completely off guard. more “What the Snowden affair taught us…the Super User problem”

A “Cheat Sheet” on the Obama Export Control Reforms

By Gary Stanley.

The initial Obama export control reforms became effective on Oct 15th.  Although these reforms promise less licensing, they come at the price of more complex controls and more extensive record keeping.  The new rules must be approached in a systematic manner.   Here’s a “cheat sheet” to help you take advantage of these significant changes to U.S. export and re-export controls. more “A “Cheat Sheet” on the Obama Export Control Reforms”

Export Control Reform – Are you Ready?

By E.K. Koh.

Parts of the US Export Control Reform went into effect on October 15th, 2013.  Are you ready?

The current system has two different control lists administered by two different departments, Commerce and State, and there are three primary export licensing agencies, Commerce, State, and the Treasury.  A multitude of agencies – Commerce, Defense, Homeland Security, Justice, State, and the Treasury – each have authority to investigate and/or enforce some or all of the export controls, each using separate IT systems that do not intercommunicate. more “Export Control Reform – Are you Ready?”